6 Tips For Road Trips With Your Dog

6 Tips For Road Trips With Your Dog

Sometimes it’s not feasible to take your dog everywhere you want to go. Maybe you have work that requires going out of the house early in the morning, or maybe you just don’t feel like spending an entire evening at home. In those instances, road trip with your dog can be a great way for both of you to get away. Road trips are fun—for humans and dogs alike. Car rides with your dog can be a nice break from the routine of home.

There are many pet friendly places to travel with your pup. But traveling with a dog can be tricky, especially for long trips or drives in the car. A drive to the park could result in hours of whining and yelping due to separation anxiety.

Here are some tips for your road trip with your dog to keep in mind before heading off on your adventure together:

1. Plan Well Ahead Of Time

Don’t wait until the last minute! Dogs need time to prepare for any kind of trip, whether it is a short jaunt around town or a long-distance trek through unfamiliar territory. You can give yourself plenty of time to make arrangements and take care of business if you start making plans far in advance. Keep in mind that dogs, like humans, may not be fully rested or focused on the day of your departure. They might sleep longer on the morning of a road trip than they would normally so don’t get them up too early (unless they are already getting excited for their adventure).

When traveling anywhere with your canine companion, there are plenty of things to consider like dog friendly accommodations for them and their favorite dog treats.

According to Trip Advisor, here are Pet Friendly Accommodations or Pet Friendly Hotels in United States.

2. Make Sure You Have The Right Equipment

Not all dog travel crates are alike. If you want to bring Fido with you on your trip, think about selecting one that has plenty of ventilation so he can stay cool when it heats up inside the truck or car during summer months. Look for lock mechanisms that attach securely but can still be opened easily should you need to reach in and grab your pooch. Try out various crates before you buy so you can find one that will fit snugly in the vehicle where Fido is going to ride.

3. Don’t Forget The Water

There are dog owners who dread the day when they have to leave their dog unattended in a car—whether it is for an errand that takes 15 minutes or for a road trip that takes hours. What dog owners don’t understand is that leaving a dog unattended in the car isn’t the same thing as leaving a dog unattended at home. A dog that is left alone in a car can suffer from heat exhaustion, overheat and die in less than an hour.
The dog’s body overheats faster than humans because of a few differences between the way dogs and people perspire. A dog’s body temperature is higher than a human’s, causing dogs to begin panting almost immediately in hot weather. One reason dog owners leave dogs in cars is because dog owners often mistake their dog’s panting as a sign that the dog isn’t hot.

Unlike a human, dogs don’t sweat; they pant to keep cool when it’s hot outside. Make sure you bring plenty of water for your dog when he rides along with you on long trips. Fill up some collapsible bowls or use travel-friendly bottles that won’t spill easily should the vehicle turn too sharply. Remember that water isn’t enough—your pup needs more than just fluids to stay healthy and hydrated in a moving vehicle! Healthy dog treats or snacks like carrot sticks are a good option.

4. Know The Rules Of The Road

Not all states have the same animal travel regulations. Make sure you know exactly what the guidelines are for your area and follow them to a “T” if you want to avoid trouble with law enforcement or having to pay fines. For example, in some places, it is illegal to let your dog ride in a vehicle that isn’t securely fastened down—even if he is safely restrained inside his crate. In other states, pets are often allowed only on back seats or in cargo areas of trucks or SUVs—not in front seats! Be aware of laws and ordinances where you live at home as well as any new rules that may come into play when traveling out of state.

5. Plan For A Safe Ride

This is especially important if you are going to be traveling long distances in your vehicle or through areas where the roads might not be as well-maintained as they are back home. Be aware of steep grades, sharp turns, heavy traffic and other hazards that could make driving more difficult than normal. If necessary, consider using a smaller vehicle like a sedan instead of a large truck or SUV—you will have less hilly terrain to deal with! Smaller cars also tend to stop faster in emergencies so keep that in mind if there is any danger on the road ahead. As always, obey all laws and use safe driving techniques when traveling with Fido in tow.

6. Be Prepared For Emergencies

It’s always good to be prepared for any kind of situation that could arise during a trip—including an emergency involving your dog. If you are on unfamiliar roads, remember that the nearest veterinarian may not be familiar with your pet should anything go wrong during your travels. Be sure to bring along a current copy of his medical records in case he needs immediate attention from a professional you trust. If Fido suffers from any chronic conditions, make sure those are well-documented as well so his care provider can treat him appropriately if necessary. Make sure you have his vaccination record handy, along with a phone number where you or someone else close by can be reached in an emergency (you don’t want to have to forgo your plans in order to rush your dog to the vet). Also, have your dog microchipped so you can prove ownership should he become lost!

We hope you enjoyed reading 6 Tips For Road Trips With Your Dog, you may also like How To Choose Toys For Your Dog.

 

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